Confederation of European Paper Industries
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Who is CEPI?

The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI)

is a Brussels-based non-profit making organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing this industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Its collective expertise provides a unique source of information both for and on the industry; coordinating essential exchanges of experience and knowledge among its members, the ability to provide technical assistance to legislators and to identify independent experts on specific issues. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 520 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 940 paper mills. Together they represent 24% of world production.

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Circular economy video

Watch our new video on why the pulp and paper industry is at the DNA of the circular economy.

 

European Paper Week 2014

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Paper recycling in Europe at 71.7% !

A reliable performance secures access to valuable raw material. Read our press release

 

Resource efficiency - Making more from our natural resources

See our new publication with concrete examples from the industry!

 

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Press Release | 03 Dec.2014

Paper or Digital? The citizen’s right to choose

Launch of the European Keep Me Posted campaign website

Keep Me Posted EU is a campaign promoting the citizen’s right to choose how they receive important information – paper, digital or both, without being penalised. This information includes tax forms, election documents as well as bills and statements from service providers. It is not an anti-digital campaign but a pro-citizen-choice campaign promoting the inclusion of vulnerable consumers at European level.


Central to the campaign is the Keep Me Posted EU Pledge, which European organisations and Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) are called upon to adopt.1 The launch of this campaign could not be timelier as research shows that in 2013 a remarkable 21% of European households still had no internet access.


Since its creation in July of this year, the campaign has rapidly gathered momentum. It has secured the support of consumer groups and organisations representing citizens that may be disadvantaged by a lack of choice or simply do not agree with the fact that choice has been taken away from them.


The growing list of supporters includes European consumer organisations, European associations representing older citizens and the disabled as well as unions. The print value chain is represented by FEPE, PostEurop, CEPI, EuPIA and Intergraf.


Béatrice Klose, Secretary General of Intergraf is very encouraged by the progress made in such a short time: “The fact that we have gained so many enthusiastic partners since start-up shows that there is a genuine need and desire for this type of initiative. We are confident that more partners will join us as the campaign’s message spreads.”


Today marks the launch of the campaign’s website www.keepmepostedeu.org. It is regularly updated with news on developments in European countries regarding the trend to push citizens towards entirely paperless communication and efforts to support citizen choice. Users can subscribe to our newsletter to keep informed on the campaign’s progress, research concerning consumers’ preferences and developments across Europe. Supporters of the initiative are encouraged to get involved in a variety of ways including petitioning MEPs and service providers and sharing personal experiences.


The EU campaign is inspired by a similar initiative in the UK. Drawing on his experience from the Keep Me Posted UK campaign, David Gold, Head of Public Affairs at Royal Mail explains further how the campaign can even benefit the organisations that are being targeted: “Service providers are now starting to see the merit of being associated with this type of campaign. With 81% of adults wanting to choose how they receive information, giving consumers a choice in how they are communicated with, rather than pushing customers online by default, is not only the right thing to do, but better for their business.”


In 2015 the campaign will be launched publicly with an event at the European Parliament encouraging its members to sign the pledge.


For more information about the Keep Me Posted EU campaign please contact info@keepmepostedeu.org.
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1The Keep Me Posted pledge is available here: http://www.keepmepostedeu.org/the-campaign/

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Press Release | 28 Nov.2014

World Economic Forum Project on the Circular Economy to Include EcoDesign Pilot from CEPI

Paper will show the way for other materials in ecodesign

The World Economic Forum’s project on the circular economy (Project MainStream) has chosen the Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) to contribute to one of the project’s three pilots for advancing circular thinking.

“An excellent track record, the right mindset of wanting to continuously raise the bar and world class knowledge in recycling were the reasons for which Project MainStream chose the CEPI pilot as a contibutor”, says Johnson Yeh, Head of Circular Economy Initiatives at the World Economic Forum.

The pilot’s objective is to consolidate existing pieces of design tools into a set of user-friendly, universal ecodesign rules for all value added elements of the paper and board value chain. The pilot, running from January 2015 for 12 months, intends to create a self-enforcing mechanism of speedy adoption of new ecodesign rules, thanks to commitments by businesses.

The World Economic Forum’s Project MainStream was launched in January this year, during the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting in Davos.The project will enable annual savings of up to $10bn for the value chain, according to World Economic Forum estimations.

“Paper is a perfect place for Project MainStream to start, given paper’s currently high recycling rate and complete infrastructure for recycling. By establishing proof-of-concept with ecodesign rules for paper, the same lesson can be applied to other materials,” says Yeh.

Although originally 100% recyclable, paper is converted by many downstream industries adding auxiliary materials, such as tapes, adhesives and printing inks. These materials will later return to paper recycling mills when closing the loop, as they cannot be sorted from paper in the dry-sorting steps before they reach paper mills. “Simple ecodesign rules for paper products would give the essential guidance for designers and developers without limiting innovation and hampering the introduction of new techniques. This would be a system-level approach, identifying the root cause and preventing problems”, says Jori Ringman, Sustainability Director at CEPI.

The goal of a circular economy is to move towards a resource efficient use of materials throughout the life cycle, beyond production and consumption. In a circular economy, collected waste and by-products become new raw materials. Whereas the European paper industry has already achieved very high recycling rates of 72%, a more systemic approach supported by ecodesign will allow further improvement of the performance in the sector. “Ecodesign could reduce the overall fibre need as well as improve the safe recycling of fibres, while improving opportunities for reusing water and by-streams of the paper and paperboard process in industrial symbiosis”, says Ringman.

The proposed project is also linked to other global sustainability initiatives, notably Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM) by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and to Sound Material Management (SMM) policies.

For more information, please contact Jori Ringman at j.ringman@cepi.org, mobile: +32 478 255 070.

Note to the Editor

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 515 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 940 paper mills. Together they represent 23% of world production.

Video on the circular economy by CEPI: http://youtu.be/lt3aHXs7FYM

Project MainStream is a collaboration led by the World Economic Forum and Ellen MacArthur Foundation, with McKinsey & Company as knowledge partners: http://www.weforum.org/projects/circular-economy


 

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Position paper | 28 Nov.2014

CEPI welcomes Commission intentions for meaningful recycling in Europe and identifies enabling measures for meeting ambitious targets

Comments by CEPI on the European Commission proposal for a DIRECTIVE OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL amending Directives 2008/98/EC on waste, 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste, 1999/31/EC on the landfill of waste, 2000/53/EC on end-of-life vehicles, 2006/66/EC on batteries and accumulators and waste batteries and accumulators, and 2012/19/EU on waste electrical and electronic equipment /* COM/2014/0397 final - 2014/0201 (COD)

Summary

• Recycling Targets must be ambitious but realistic to increase collection in an environment where some Member States have already reached high recycling rates. Member States should set their target for paper packaging recycling at a minimum of 80% by 2020.
• Packaging Recycling targets in Europe should not discriminate between the different consumer packaging materials
• The proposed methodology to calculate recycling rates can favour high quality recycling but it should refer to material specific standards or similar quality assurances. For paper, the input method should continue to apply under strict input quality criteria, including for exports
• Incineration restrictions and separate paper collection obligations are needed as complementary measures to ensure recyclable paper diverted from landfills gets actually recycled.
• Final recycling must be clearly defined to ensure targets are meaningful and can be compared between Member States.

Recycling Targets: Minimum targets for Paper Packaging Recycling Rates should be set at 80% by 2020 in all Member States


European Paper Industry is a world champion in recycling, but reaching new targets will be increasingly challenging as several Member States have already reached recycling rates close to the theoretical potential of paper recycling. The average European Paper Recycling rate was 71,7% in 2013 and the sector has set a target of 70% recycling rate by 2015. The recycling rate has increased significantly from levels around 40% in 1990 and 62% in 2005, but has started levelling up since the last five years. As we reach the absolute potentials of paper recycling in some Member States, setting ambitious targets in all Member States is crucial to further stipulate recycling in less than average performing countries. Too ambitious average targets alone will however not be sufficient to reach the objectives set out in the circular economy communication. Further improvement of the paper and board packaging recycling rate will largely depend on progress in less than average performing countries. CEPI therefore proposes that all Member States set their target for paper packaging recycling at a minimum of 80% by 2020. Concrete targets for 2025 and 2030 should be set once the performance based on the proposed methodology and progress towards 2020 targets is assessed, e.g. through the newly proposed early warning system.
Recycling targets in Europe should not discriminate between consumer packaging materials and one material should not compensate for others in a Member State’s calculation of all packaging waste prepared for re-use and recycled. Recyclability and the recycling performance have increasingly become key aspects in the competition between consumer packaging materials.


Calculation Methodology : for paper, the input method should continue to apply under strict input quality criteria
CEPI welcomes the Commission’s intention to set the focus on high quality recycling. The recycling process can only deliver efficiently produced high quality recycled products if the input to this final recycling process fulfills strict quality requirements, too. The Commission proposal rightly distinguishes between final recycling processes with « clean » input material, for which the input method would continue to be applied, and final recycling processes with lesser quality material, for which the output method would have to be applied. CEPI understands the proposed discarded materials as non-target material that is not part of the original product and can be separated in dry sorting.
In the production of recycled paper, the input material for the recycling process is covered by a European Standard (EN 643). This standard sets limits on the share of non-paper components generally not exceeding 1,5%. CEPI is therefore of the opinion that for paper, the input method should continue to apply. However, the Commission proposal leaves too much room for interpretation and should refer to European Standards or similar quality assurances.
Paper for Recycling exported outside the European Union should count towards the recycling rate provided it meets the EN 643 standard and is effectively recycled outside Europe at broadly equivalent environmental conditions as in the EU. This should be demonstrated by a certification scheme as it is being considered by the European Commission and which would include in its scope the reprocessing site in the destination country and ensure traceability through adequate documentation.
Furthermore, it is of great importance that the denominator for the calculation of the recycling rates is identical in all Member States to allow for comparison.

Complementary measures to reach recycling targets
To reach high recycling targets based on the proposed new methodology, complementary measures next to the introduction of a landfill ban are however essential:


Incineration restrictions
CEPI welcomes the introduction of a landfill ban for recyclable waste. However, CEPI thinks that formulating a landfill ban for recyclable material and high recycling targets is not sufficient to reach the objectives. CEPI therefore thinks it is needed to formulate incineration restrictions for recyclable material from the municipal waste stream. This is to avoid waste is only shifted one step up in the waste hierarchy. In the past, several Member States have set the focus on diversion from landfill. This has partly led to low quality collection systems, which would not be able to deliver the input quality to recycling processes according to the new methodology as suggested bythe Commission proposal.

Obligation to collect paper separately from other recyclables and residual waste
To ensure reaching the required quality input for paper recycling processes, paper should be collected separately from other recyclables such as plastics, metal and glass, and from residual waste. The Waste Directive of 2008 has formulated a separate collection target in 2008, however Member States have interpreted this requirement in different ways. CEPI therefore urges the Commission to reinforce the requirement on separate collection for paper. Separate collection is crucial to achieve the landfill restrictions proposed by the commission.


Current recycling definition is too vague
The current definition of recycling is too vague, as it includes next to “reprocessing” also “any other recovery operations”. This leads to a wide range of interpretations, including on the recycling rate, between countries and materials. The only way to ensure material that has been discarded is effectively back in the circular economy is to make sure it is not recognized recycled unless it is reprocessed in a production process into new products, materials or substances that have comparable properties to the corresponding virgin raw materials. The proposed methodology for high quality recycling cannot be reached without a precise recycling definition. Article 3 (17) of directive 2008/98/EC should be amended as follows :


• ‘recycling’ means any recovery operation by which waste materials are reprocessed into products, materials or substances whether for the original or other purposes. It includes the reprocessing of organic material but does not include energy recovery and the reprocessing into materials that are to be used as fuels or for backfilling operations; ‘final recycling’ means reprocessing in a production process of waste or materials reclaimed from waste into products, materials or substances with similar properties as the equivalent virgin raw material based product, material or substance. It excludes pre-processing.


Next to these measures, CEPI has the following comments on the Commission proposal:
Extended Producer Responsibility : CEPI believes that the proposed provisions of Annex VII paragraph 6.1 and 6.4 place disproportionate financial burden on producers and cover aspects beyond the producers’ control. Putting the burden of « financial contributions to cover the entire cost of waste management… » would act as a disincentive for other actors with roles and responsibilities in the waste collection and sorting chain to focus on cost efficiency. Consequently the competitiveness of European economy would be harmed. CEPI believes that extended producer responsibility should not allow overlapping and duplicating payments: fees should only apply in absence of action when responsibility is delegated to compliance schemes, and fees should be charged on the basis of true cost after the deduction of all fees and revenues related to the waste generated. CEPI also believes Annex VII concerning minimum requirements for EPR should not be amended through the adoption of delegated acts since they are an essential part of the legislation.
Renewability : CEPI is concerned that the Commission published a proposal on the circular economy without mentioning renewability. CEPI believes that the contribution of renewable materials and products to the circular economy should be acknowledged, e.g. by adding renewability to the packaging eco-design options for Member States consideration. CEPI believes that such a non-binding list of ecodesign options is preferred over national packaging design requirements as proposed by the Commission as the latter would undermine the single market by producing barriers to trade.
Definition of Municipal Waste : The definition of municipal waste should not include material from the retail sector. The collection of waste from the retail sector is already well organised. Including the retail sector would divert the focus from the challenge of improving the waste collection from households and small shops.


For more information, please contact Mr. Ulrich Leberle at (u.leberle@cepi.org), mobile n°: +32 479 905 921

 

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Position paper | 21 Mar.2014

Customer Requests: CEPI recommends use of harmonised disclaimers for voluntary declarations in the European pulp and paper industry

Companies are experiencing, in their daily customer contacts, requests for various declarations, frequently related to non-relevant topics and often totally misplaced. Answering such requests can cause misunderstandings with customers.

In order to help companies give responsible and harmonised answers to their customers CEPI recommends a set of standard disclaimers (see annex), to be routinely used depending on the type of request and on the individual discretion of each company. These disclaimers are recommended to be used routinely when signing declarations in reply to those requests, by inserting them in the declaration document. Using the same disclaimers across the pulp and paper industry will reduce the pressure of making unsubstantiated declarations and reduce reputation risks as well as the risk of possible financial claims for individual companies and the sector as a whole.

i. These disclaimers are not intended to be used when such declarations of compliance are mandatory (required by law). These shall be prepared and issued mandatorily, following the forms and ways of releasing them as the legislation requires.

ii. These disclaimers are intended to be used for voluntary declarations regarding statements attesting to the compliance with specific legislation or with qualitative and technical adaptations to non-binding technical standards. For such requests for voluntary declarations, three standard disclaimers are recommended by CEPI:

a. Issuing a declaration on the absence of certain substances
b. Refusing a declaration of compliance with non-relevant legislation
c. Issuing a declaration of compliance with non-relevant legislation

For more information, please contact Jori Ringman, at j.ringman@cepi.org, telephone n°: +32 47825 50 70

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Additional information

CEPI aisbl - The Confederation of European Paper Industries
The Confederation of European Paper Industries (CEPI) is a Brussels-based non-profit organisation regrouping the European pulp and paper industry and championing industry’s achievements and the benefits of its products. Through its 18 member countries (17 European Union members plus Norway) CEPI represents some 520 pulp, paper and board producing companies across Europe, ranging from small and medium sized companies to multi-nationals, and 950 paper mills. Together they represent 24% of world production.

Website: http://www.cepi.org/ mail@cepi.org

Annex : Disclaimers

1. Requests that may be relevant to our sector, but which are made in a form that is neither in line with legislation nor with scientific common sense. The most frequent case to be considered is a request to declare the “absence” of certain chemicals, whilst the applicable legislation sets a specific limit or no limits are set at all. The voluntary release of such declarations should be accompanied by the following disclaimer:

With reference to the present declaration, ‘absence’ means that the final product may contain substances that were in the incoming raw materials as traces or impurities and were not intentionally added during the pulp and papermaking process.

2. Requests related to declarations that are totally irrelevant to our sector1.
In case the company decides not to release any declarations, the following disclaimer should be used:

The declaration that has been requested cannot be released, as it concerns2 [(for example) the restrictions on the content of the chemicals listed in the Directive 2002/95/EC, the so called ‘RoHS directive’, on the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment.]
This legislation is not applicable to pulp and paper products.

3. In case the company nevertheless decides to voluntarily release a declaration where the request is related to legislation or standards that are not relevant to pulp and paper, the voluntary release of such declarations should be accompanied by the following disclaimer:

Where the present declaration refers to legislation or a standard in which this product is not included in the scope, ‘compliance’ means a declaration of intent by the manufacturer, whereas there are no legal means to formally comply due to the limitations set by the scope of the referred legislation or standard. ‘Absence’ means the final product may contain substances that were in incoming raw materials as traces or impurities and were not intentionally added during the pulp and papermaking process.


* * *
1A typical example is the declaration on the compliance with the restrictions on the chemicals listed in Directive 2002/95/EC (RoHS Directive) regarding the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment. Naturally, such declarations are mandatory in special cases where the product is used for electronic applications.
2Insert the reference and scope of the legislation or standard relevant to the request.

 

The disclaimer has been translated into Spanish by our member Aspapel. Read it here
 

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news | 03 Nov.2014

European forest sector calls for continued efforts for a future Legally Binding Agreement on forests in Europe

The Secretary Generals of the key European forest and forest-based sector associations, namely CEPF, CEPI, AEBIOM, CEI-Bois, Copa-Cogeca, ELO, ENDE, Eustafor, FECOF, UEF and USSE have adressed a letter to the Ministers responsible for Forests and Forestry in Europe, on the occasion of the Forest Europe Expert Level Meeting on 6-7 November 2014 in Cuenca Spain. In this letter, they are calling for a continued and strenghtened effort for a future Legally Binding Agreement (LBA) on Forests in Europe.

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news | 11 Sep.2014

Alliance of Energy Intensive Industries renews calls for ‘carbon leakage’ protection

The Alliance of Energy Intensive Industries (AEII) has published an open letter  to the heads of State and Governments of the EU Member States, the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union and the European Commission on carbon leakage. CEPI is part of this alliance.


The 2030 climate and energy framework must guarantee predictability for industry by setting the principles for measures against carbon and investment leakage now.


The undersigned manufacturing industries are the foundation of Europe’s economic fabric, drivers of jobs and growth in Europe. We represent over 30 000 companies in the EU with more than 4 million direct jobs, and around 30 million jobs in our manufacturing value chains.


The EU should focus on promoting recovery and growth of industrial production in Europe, in line with the objective to reinstate industry’s share of EU GDP to 20% by 20201. European industries need a stable and long term legislative framework that effectively combines EU climate ambition with EU industrial competiveness.


Current carbon leakage provisions under the EU Emissions Trading Directive, if not revised rapidly, will result in a huge shortage in free allowances and increasing direct and indirect costs (the pass-through of carbon costs into power prices) for even the most efficient installations in Europe. In the period from 2021 to 2030, when the provisions against carbon leakage and free allocation would be phased out, our industries are expected to face hundreds of billions of Euros in direct costs and costs passed through in electricity prices.2 The impact on energy intensive industries will simply be overwhelming.


Knowing that the Commission will be looking at “an improved system of free allocation of allowances with a better focus” for 2021-2030 is not enough. Industry needs a clear outline of policy measures to effectively prevent the risk of carbon and investment leakage.

The Commission’s legislative proposals currently only cover EU ETS structural reforms, which increase both carbon prices as well as the unilateral burden on EU industry, and expose EU jobs and growth to aggravated carbon leakage risk. Unfortunately, the Commission intends to publish proposals to prevent carbon leakage only at a later stage.


This is contrary to the guidance resulting from the March 2014 European Council, instructing the Commission “to rapidly develop measures to prevent potential carbon leakage in order to ensure the competitiveness of Europe's energy-intensive industries”, and this to provide by October 2014 “the necessary stability and predictability for its economic operators”.


The European Parliament stressed in February 2014 “that the 2030 climate and energy policy targets must be technically and economically feasible for EU industries and that best performers should have no direct or indirect additional costs resulting from climate policies; [that] the provisions for carbon leakage should provide 100% free allocation of technically achievable benchmarks, with no reduction factor for carbon leakage sectors.” 3
We therefore urge the European Council to give guidance at its summit on 23/24 October confirming that carbon leakage measures will be continued after 2020, as well as outlining the principles for the level of protection in order to safeguard predictability, investment certainty, jobs and growth in Europe:


Until a global agreement on climate change provides for a level playing field for energy intensive sectors at risk of carbon and investment leakage, best performers should not be penalised by direct or indirect additional costs resulting from the framework. This implies:


- Truly 100% free allocation based on technically and economically achievable benchmarks (including heat and fuel based benchmarks), reflecting recent production, and without a correction factor.
- Harmonized off-setting of all CO2 costs passed through into electricity prices in all Member States.


The Market Stability Reserve must only be considered in conjunction with the above measures, instead of through piecemeal approach.
The undersigned energy intensive industries are all at risk of carbon and investment leakage and therefore must be safeguarded through the above measures
.


These measures provide the essential signal towards industry for predictability and investment certainty, and secure an environmentally and economically sound EU ETS which does not distort the market. We strongly believe that these measures, together with strong innovation funds to support breakthrough innovation in industrial technologies and processes, will offer a win-win situation for the global climate and the European economy.4
 

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1 European Commission Communication "For a European Industrial Renaissance", COM(2014) 14/2
2 The Commission expects a price of €40/tCO2 in 2030, modelling presented by Point Carbon expects ca. €48/tCO2 (source: www.ceps.eu/taskforce/review-eu-ets-issues); Climate Economics Chair calculates a price of up €70/tCO2 in a high scenario in its report EU ETS reform in the Climate-Energy Package 2030: First lessons from the ZEPHYR model, Paris 2014.
3 European Parliament resolution of 4 February 2014 on the Action Plan for a competitive and sustainable steel industry in Europe (2013/2177(INI))
4 The agreement on the reform of the EU ETS between the Dutch government, industry and NGOs proves that a compromise and a balanced solution between the pillars of EU sustainable policy – growth, jobs, and environmental protection – is possible by applying an allocation more closely linked to economic reality e.g. a dynamic emissions trading system.

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publications | 02 Dec.2014

Shifting Gears for a New EU Industrial Partnership - A Manifesto

The Alliance for a Competitive European Industry groups 11 major European industry sector associations (including CEPI) and BUSINESSEUROPE.

The common objective of its members is to promote the competitiveness of European industry on a global scale and to help address Europe’s transformation towards a sustainable and low-carbon future.

The Alliance members account for:
• 23 million jobs
• 1.3 million companies (more than 3/4 of which are SMEs)
• €5.7 trillion turnover annually
• 10.7% of EU GDP

The EU manufacturing industry accounts for about 20% of European GDP. But industry’s strategic importance is far greater because it accounts for 1 in 5 jobs and it is at the very heart of both innovation (with 80% of all R&D expenditure) and global competitiveness (with 75% of exports). Europe needs a vibrant industry to spark the innovation and growth required to meet the societal and environmental challenges that lie ahead.

Europe’s political leadership, including the European Commission, the European Parliament and Member State governments has acknowledged the exceptional role of industry. Each of these institutions has repeatedly declared that a strong and competitive industrial base is a key factor for achieving a knowledge-based, safe and sustainable low-carbon resource-efficient economy with substantial manufacturing employment.

We call on the political leadership to develop a long-term industrial policy that would establish favourable, stable, consistent and predictable conditions to help businesses to invest, to promote excellence, innovation and sustainability and to ensure we meet the European Commission’s goal that industry’s share of GDP should be as much as 20% by 2020.
 

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publications | 01 Dec.2014

Sustainability summary (infographic)

Sustainability and competitiveness have to go hand in hand for industry to excel. The European paper industry is a leading example of this. It is at the core of the bioeconomy. Below are some figures from our latest Sustainability Report verifying the exceptional concurrence of sustainability and competitiveness in our industry. The full report is available at www.cepi-sustainability.eu

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